What to Look for in a Fishing Companion and Why

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The Person You Take Fishing Can Make or Break the Trip

I’ve learned a lot about fishing over the years. I’ve had incredibly good days and some really tough ones. I’ve learned some lessons that have taught me the importance of selecting the persons I go with, whether I take them or they take me.

Whether on a river or a lake, your boat companion can make or break your experience. This article is about who you choose to fish with and why. I have one primary principle I hold to: no negativity--and there's a reason.

Whether on a river or a lake, your boat companion can make or break your experience. This article is about who you choose to fish with and why. I have one primary principle I hold to: no negativity–and there’s a reason.

The Reason is Simple

That companion can make the day memorable or terrible depending on the type of attitude they bring to the boat.

It’s not just the degree of my enjoyment that’s at stake in the choice. I believe it affects whether we catch fish or not. Positive attitudes win, even with inexperienced fishers. Negative attitudes filled with complaining, doubting, and blaming seldom produce good fishing. Even if in the latter case, we are lucky to catch fish, I find I go home regretting the loss of valuable time when I’ve been around negativity too long.

Good Company, Good Memories

I’ve spent the entire day in a boat with a complainer and I’ve spent two days in a boat with a gossip. But I spend a month in a boat with someone who looks at fishing with pleasure and accepts the challenge no matter the conditions, no matter the weather, no matter the catch. And I’ll choose to remember and fish again with the one who adds to my pleasure.

Encouragement and Fun Contribute to Success

If you encourage a boy or girl and praise them moderately when they succeed, they will take the challenge of fishing with enthusiasm and in time become greater fishers. This is true with children of every age. If you take a fully grown man or woman fishing for the first time in this person’s life, they are a child on the water. They have to start new and there’s no way around that. Encourage them and give them moderate praise when they succeed and you’ll not only have a friend for life, but you’ll see the reward in their expression of life as they begin to believe they too can succeed at fishing.